Health Awareness Topic of the Month – Tuberculosis Screening

Student Health works hard to CDC_TBeducate students on a variety of topics including prevention, treatment of common illness and injury, and public health initiatives.

March is TB Awareness Month, thus, this is your opportunity to learn more about Tuberculosis! Below is a message from Dr. Tom Howard, Associate Medical Director at Student Health.

Tuberculosis is an uncommon infection in the US, but more so internationally.  It is spread through respiratory droplets (coughing) and requires a good amount of exposure to an individual with coughing.  Passing contact in hallways, classrooms and dining facilities is not a risk of contracting this infection.  In most people who breathe in TB bacteria and become infected, the body is able to fight the bacteria to stop them from growing. The bacteria becomes inactive, but they remain alive in the body and can become active in the individual at a later time. This is called a latent TB infection.  When the bacterium grows in the lungs evidence of infection can be detected by chest xray.  These individuals with active disease may or may not be infectious, based on the presence of a cough or evidence of the bacteria on sputum evaluation.

Screening for Tuberculosis involves questioning for exposure-travel to high-risk countries, exposure to infected individuals and symptoms (cough, fever, weight loss).  Screening is performed with a skin test or a blood test.  Both screening tests are quite effective in identifying affected individuals and hence the low incidence of this disease in the United States.  Individuals with an abnormal screening test undergo further screening for symptoms and chest x-ray looking for active lung involvement.  Treatment of individuals with abnormal screening involves the use of a course of antibiotics for 6-9 months.  Those with symptomatic Tuberculosis require more complex antibiotic treatment for similar periods of time.

Further information can be obtained from the CDC at:

http://www.cdc.gov/tb/publications/factsheets/general/ltbiandactivetb.htm

http://www.cdc.gov/tb/publications/factsheets/general.htm

Yours in Health,

Tom Howard, MD

 

Massage Therapy Now Available

Come relax with us! Massages for students, faculty and staff are offered by appointment Tuesdays & Wednesdays 8:30 a.m. -12:30 p.m. and Thursdays 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. with licensed massage therapists.  Please call 919-513-3260 for details and to schedule your appointment today.  Sessions are 25 or 50 minutes and packages are available.  

More information available here: Therapeutic Massage at NC State

Student Health Services Video

To help students and families gain a better understanding about the Health Center and requirements for a successful start at NC State click here.  This video highlights who we are, what services we provide and gives accurate up-to-date information to assist you in joining the Wolfpack family.

Stomach Bug Infecting Campus

Gastroenteritis also known as stomach bug or stomach flu, is infecting campus.  Symptoms include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain/cramping, fever and / or headache.  If you are experiencing these symptoms make an appointment online or call 919-515-7107.  The virus is spread by touching contaminated surfaces or objects and then touching your mouth, eating contaminated foods or drinks, and direct contact with stool or vomit while caring for a sick person.

If you become sick, take care of yourself with:

  • Medications. This may include fever reducing, anti-nausea, and/or anti-diarrhea medicines.
  • Oral Rehydration. Sip only clear non caffeinated liquids, such as ginger ale, water, ice chips, sport drinks, broth soups.
  • Diet. Once liquids are tolerated eat a bland diet.  This would include crackers, noodles, rice, and toast, and limit dairy.  Advance your diet as tolerated.
  • IV Fluids, as needed. Make an appointment with Student Health for this treatment.

Prevention is key to staying well.   Washing hands is the most important thing to do to prevent getting or spreading the infection.  Also, decontaminate surfaces and objects, such a computer keyboards, door handles, and steering wheels.

For more information visit the CDC Norovirus Information Page and Student Health Services