Student Blue Insurance Waiver or Enrollment Open

Eligible students who wish to enroll in Student Blue coverage for Fall 2014 are encouraged to submit an enrollment request no later than September 10, 2014 to ensure timely receipt of insurance ID cards. Students who are enrolled by default will not receive ID cards until after the deadline has passed. Students are automatically charged for Student Blue coverage.
Need to waive Student Blue coverage?
+ If you have creditable health insurance coverage, you must waive the Student Blue coverage and provide proof of your coverage each university semester. The charge will then be removed.

Continue reading

Tips to Avoid the Flu

  • Get the flu vaccine. (Clinic January 17th at Student Health from 1-4 pm)
  • Wash hands often with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand rub.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth. Germs spread this way.
  • Try to avoid close contact with sick people.
  • Practice good health habits – plenty of sleep and exercise, reduce stress, drink plenty of fluids, and eat healthy foods. Continue reading

Student Health Services Video

To help students and families gain a better understanding about the Health Center and requirements for a successful start at NC State click here.  This video highlights who we are, what services we provide and gives accurate up-to-date information to assist you in joining the Wolfpack family.

Stomach Bug Infecting Campus

Gastroenteritis also known as stomach bug or stomach flu, is infecting campus.  Symptoms include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain/cramping, fever and / or headache.  If you are experiencing these symptoms make an appointment online or call 919-515-7107.  The virus is spread by touching contaminated surfaces or objects and then touching your mouth, eating contaminated foods or drinks, and direct contact with stool or vomit while caring for a sick person.

If you become sick, take care of yourself with:

  • Medications. This may include fever reducing, anti-nausea, and/or anti-diarrhea medicines.
  • Oral Rehydration. Sip only clear non caffeinated liquids, such as ginger ale, water, ice chips, sport drinks, broth soups.
  • Diet. Once liquids are tolerated eat a bland diet.  This would include crackers, noodles, rice, and toast, and limit dairy.  Advance your diet as tolerated.
  • IV Fluids, as needed. Make an appointment with Student Health for this treatment.

Prevention is key to staying well.   Washing hands is the most important thing to do to prevent getting or spreading the infection.  Also, decontaminate surfaces and objects, such a computer keyboards, door handles, and steering wheels.

For more information visit the CDC Norovirus Information Page and Student Health Services

Student Health Center LEED Gold Certified

The Student Health Center has achieved LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Gold Certification. We are proud to be the first LEED Gold building on NC State’s Campus.  In addition, we are the first east coast Student Health Center, and the second nationally, to receive this honor.  Continue reading

Before You Arrive

There are several health-related actions you need to take before you come to NC State University. After you have been accepted, please review the information below carefully in advance of your arrival so that you can complete these tasks within 30 days of your acceptance.

Complete Your Medical History Online

  • Log in to HealthWeb with your Unity id and password.
  • Click Forms on the left.
  • Read the instructions.
  • Scroll to the bottom of the page.
  • Click Health History Form.
  • Complete the form to the best of your knowledge.

Provide Proof of Immunizations
In accordance with North Carolina state public health law, you must provide the Student Health Center with proof of your immunizations. If you do not meet this requirement within 30 days of your acceptance, you will be dropped from all your courses. It will cost $150 to re-enroll.  If you have questions about this requirement, please review our Immunization Compliance Policy for further details.

Tracking down evidence of your immunizations can be challenging. If you or your parents do not have your immunization records, we suggest that you check with your personal physician, county health department, previous college or university, or military branch.  The NC Department of Health and Human Services has additional tips for tracking down your immunization record.

If you have official records of your immunizations, such as transcripts, health department records, or WHO cards, please complete the following steps:

  • Log in to HealthWeb with your Unity id and password.
  • Click Forms on the left.
  • Read the instructions.
  • Scroll to the bottom of the page.
  • Click Immunizations Page.
  • Referring to your official records, enter the dates of your shots in the online form.
  • Click Proceed to submit your information to the Student Health Center for processing.
  • Mail, fax, or hand-deliver a hard copy of the official records bearing these dates to the Student Health Center Immunization Compliance office.
    Fax to
    : 1.888.972.4149 
    Mail to
    :
    Attention: Immunizations Department
    N.C. State University
    Campus Box 7304
    Raleigh, NC 27695-7304

If you have unofficial records of your immunizations, (for example, you may have baby books without a doctor’s signature, or your mother’s personal records), please complete the following steps:

  • Log in to HealthWeb with your Unity id and password.
  • Click Forms on the left.
  • Read the instructions.
  • Scroll to the bottom of the page.
  • Click Immunizations Page.
  • Referring to your unofficial records, enter the dates of your shots in the online form.
  • Before you click Proceed, use File/Print or Ctrl+P to print your browser window so that you have a paper copy of the form showing the dates you just entered.
  • Click Proceed to submit your information to the Student Health Center for processing.
  • Take the paper copy of the form that you just printed from HealthWeb to your healthcare provider, and have him or her sign it. Your provider’s signature makes your dates official.
  • Mail, fax, or hand-deliver a hard copy of the official records bearing these dates to the Student Health Center Immunization Compliance office.
    Fax to: 1.888.972-4149
    Mail to
    :
    Attention: Immunizations Department
    N.C. State University
    Campus Box 7304
    Raleigh, NC 27695-7304

Many students find it easier to gather their own records, because it saves them doctor’s office visits and associated fees. Some students are short a shot or two, and will have to visit their doctors for shots anyway. If you are missing shots, please enter the dates that you do have on the HealthWeb form as described above, print the form, and bring it with you to the doctor. Your doctor can then update the dates for your missing shots, date, sign, and stamp your form, and forward the hard copy to the Student Health Center Immunization Compliance office.

If you have no records at all, you’ll need to visit your healthcare provider to receive the required immunizations. Have your doctor provide you with a complete record that shows the date of your immunizations, enter the dates into the HealthWeb form as described above, and mail, fax, or hand-deliver a paper copy of the complete record to the Student Health Center Immunization Compliance Office.

Tuberculosis (Tb) Screening (International Students and non-U.S. citizens only)
If you are either an international student or a non-U.S. citizen, you must have a tuberculin (PPD) test administered by a NC State University acceptable medical facility within the 12 months preceding the first day of classes. PPD readings must be stated in MM in duration.

We do not accept the results of PPD tests or chest x-rays completed in medical facilities outside the United States. You may wait and have these test(s) done after you arrive at NC State University. Student Health Services can perform a blood test to detect Tb bacteria infection. If you receive this test at the Student Health Center, and have health insurance coverage under the University-sponsored Health Insurance Plan, your health insurance policy will cover the cost of the test if given after the effective insurance date. If you need this this test done please call 919-515-2563 to make an appointment once you are on campus.

Complete the Parental Consent for Treatment Form (Students under the age of 18 only)
If you are under the age of 18, your parent or guardian should download and complete the Parental Consent for Treatment Form. You may then mail, fax or hand-deliver the form to the Student Health Center.
Fax to: 1.888.972.4151
Mail to
:
Attention: Immunizations Department
N.C. State University
Campus Box 7304
Raleigh, NC 27695-7304

Insurance 101

Fall 2014 Student Blue Enrollment/Waiver period is open! ACT NOW!  Students may enroll in the Student Blue policy or provide proof of private health insurance and waive out of the Student Blue plan at this time.

Spring 2014 Student Blue Appeal period has closed.*All appeal forms were reviewed by the Student Health Insurance Appeal Committee and all decisions are final. 

Please contact the Insurance Department if you have any questions at student-health-insurance@ncsu.edu or 919-515-2563. 

Health Insurance Basics
Health insurance protects you from financial losses due to illness or injury. In exchange for your payments, (known as premiums,) your insurance company promises to pay for some or all of your health care services.

Health Insurance Terms

Benefits – Medical expenses that your health insurance policy covers

Exclusions – Medical and other expenses that your health insurance policy does not cover

Premium – Money you pay your insurance company in exchange for insurance benefits

Claim – Your formal request to your insurance company for their reimbursement of your medical benefits

Co-Insurance – The percentage of covered expenses you share with your insurance company

Co-pay or Co-payment – The dollar amount you must pay toward the cost of a benefit. Usually paid at your doctor’s office visit.

Deductible – The dollar amount of eligible expenses you must pay during each policy year before benefits are payable by the insurance company.

Provider – Any person or entity that provides health care services. A provider could be a doctor, a counselor, a hospital, or a physical therapist, just to name a few. Providers are usually licensed by the state in which they practice medicine.

Network – A group of doctors, hospitals, and other providers with whom a health insurance company contracts to provide discounted services to insured individuals.

In-network – A provider or health care facility that is part of a health insurance plan’s network. In general, insured individuals pay less money out-of-pocket when they see in-network providers.

Out-of-network – Describes a provider or health care facility which is not part of a health plan’s network. In general insured individuals usually pay more money out-of-pocket when they see out-of-network providers.

Allowed amount – The maximum dollar amount an insurance company will pay for a given procedure or service. If a provider has a contract with an insurance company, the provider and the insurance company negotiate an allowed amount for each service or procedure. If a provider has a contract with a health insurance company, then the health insurance company considers the provider in-network and will not charge more than the allowed amount for a given procedure.

Usual, Customary & Reasonable (UCR) – The average charge for a given procedure or service. Typically based on the provider’s local area. If a provider is out-of-network, then there is no contractual agreement on how much he or she can charge for a given procedure. To help manage cost, insurance companies will often process out-of-network claims based on UCR. If the provider’s actual charge exceeds UCR, then the patient could be responsible for the difference between the UCR and actual charge amounts.

Difference Between Co-Insurance and Deductible
If your health insurance company says a covered benefit “applies to deductible and co-insurance,” you must pay the amount of your deductible. Your deductible is a declining balance. You must pay the amount of your deductible before your insurance company begins to reimburse you for medical expenses.

After you have paid your deductible, then you only need to pay co-insurance, or a portion of your medical expenses. Your health insurance company pays the rest. Under most health insurance plans, there is a limit to the amount of co-insurance you have to pay. This is known as an “out-of-pocket maximum.” In general, you pay your deductible and co-insurance directly to the doctor’s office, not to the insurance company.

Co-Pays or Co-Payments
You pay a co-pay (or co-payment) at the doctor’s office. A co-payment is a fixed amount of money that you pay when the doctor delivers (or renders) services to you. Co-pays DO NOT count toward your deductible or co-insurance. Depending on your insurance policy and on the kind of doctor you see, the amount of your co-pay may not always be the same. For example, you might pay a $20 co-pay to see a Family Practitioner, but you might pay a $50 co-pay to see a specialist, such as an Oncologist. In general, if the doctor’s title has “ist” at the end, the doctor is a specialist and not a primary care doctor.

Example In-Network Claim Under UNC System Health Insurance Plan (Deductible Not Yet Met)
If you have not yet met your deductible, the example below illustrates how your claim might break down. The dollar amounts in this example are for illustrative purposes only. Actual dollar amounts will vary depending on the service(s) you receive and the provider(s) you see:

Claim Breakdown Patient Responsibility Insurance Company Responsibility
Total amount of claim = $250 $20 co-pay 0
Deductible Maximum = $200 $200 deductible 0
Co-insurance Maximum = $2000 $6 co-insurance (20% of remaining $30) $24 co-insurance (80% of remaining $30)
Total $226 $24

Explanation of Above Claim
Because you pay a co-pay at your doctor’s office visit, your co-pay is deducted first: $250-$20 = $230. Next, your deductible applies: $230-$200 = $30. Your co-insurance applies next. You are responsible for 20% of $30, or $6. Your insurance company is responsible for 80% of $30, or $24. Therefore your total responsibility is $20 + $200 + $6 or $226.

Example In-Network Claim Under UNC System Health Insurance Plan (Deductible Met)
If you have met your deductible, the example below illustrates how your claim might break down. The dollar amounts in this example are for illustrative purposes only. Actual dollar amounts will vary depending on the service(s) you receive and the provider(s) you see:

Claim Breakdown Patient Responsibility Insurance Company Responsibility
Total amount of claim = $250 $20 co-pay 0
Deductible Maximum = $200 0 0
Co-insurance Maximum = $2000 $46 co-insurance (20% of remaining $230) $184 co-insurance (80% of remaining $230)
Total $66 $184

Explanation of Above Claim
Because you pay a co-pay at your doctor’s office visit, your co-pay is deducted first: $250-$20 = $230. Because you have met your deductible, your remaining balance is $230. Your co-insurance applies next. You are responsible for 20% of $230, or $46. Your insurance company is responsible for 80% of $230, or $184. Therefore your total responsibility is $20 + $46 or $66.

Example Out-of-Network Claim Under UNC System Health Insurance Plan (Deductible Not Yet Met)
If you have not yet met your deductible, the example below illustrates how your claim might break down. The dollar amounts in this example are for illustrative purposes only. Actual dollar amounts will vary depending on the service(s) you receive and the provider(s) you see:

Claim Breakdown Patient Responsibility Insurance Company Responsibility
Total amount of claim = $250 $20 co-pay 0
Deductible Maximum = $200 $200 0
Co-insurance Maximum = $4000 $9 co-insurance (30% of remaining $30) $21 co-insurance (70% of remaining $30)
Total $229 (may be greater if provider’s charges are more than the health insurance company allows) $21

Explanation of Above Claim
Because you pay a co-pay at your doctor’s office visit, your co-pay is deducted first: $250-$20 = $230. Next, your deductible applies: $230-$200 = $30. Your co-insurance applies next. You are responsible for 30% of $30, or $9. Your insurance company is responsible for 70% of $30, or $21. Therefore your total responsibility is $20 + $200 + $9 or $229, but you may owe more money if the doctor charges more for a service than the insurance company allows.

Example Out-of-Network Claim Under University-sponsored Health Insurance Plan (Deductible Met)
If you have met your deductible, the example below illustrates how your claim might break down. The dollar amounts in this example are for illustrative purposes only. Actual dollar amounts will vary depending on the service(s) you receive and the provider(s) you see:

Claim Breakdown Patient Responsibility Insurance Company Responsibility
Total amount of claim = $250 $20 co-pay 0
Deductible Maximum = $200 0 0
Co-insurance Maximum = $4000 $69 co-insurance (30% of remaining $230) $161 co-insurance (70% of remaining $230)
Total $89 (may be greater if provider’s charges are more than the health insurance company allows) $161

Explanation of Above Claim
Because you pay a co-pay at your doctor’s office visit, your co-pay is deducted first: $250-$20 = $230. Because you have met your deductible, your remaining balance is $230. Your co-insurance applies next. You are responsible for 30% of $230, or $69. Your insurance company is responsible for 70% of $230, or $161. Therefore your total responsibility is $20 + $69 or $89.

For questions please contact student-health-insurance@ncsu.edu